Keep the court where it is: where the people need it!

According to the NWI Times, on Friday, February 8, 2013, there will be a court hearing about whether to grant a restraining order to keep the child support department of the Juvenile Court in Gary, Indiana. The judge would like to consolidate her court in Crown point. I think this is a move that disproportionately and adversely affects the poor, minorities and women!

This move will inconvenience thousands of people, many of whom do not have transportation.  And just exactly how do supporters of the move suggest that people get to court with no county-wide transportation? Are these the same people who have repeatedly shot down a food and beverage tax in Lake County that would pay for a county bus service?

Remember, generally you are required to appear in court; it is not like an invitation to tea that you can easily reschedule. This will only add more stress to an already stressful situation. And, missed court dates due to transportation issues will be more costly for everyone concerned.

This is a move that would seriously hurt those who can least afford it. The cost in lost work time, gasoline and stress on poor families far outweighs any personal convenience efficiency gained by the judge and her staff. Leave the services where the people who need it are at. I am sure the judge and her staff have cars….

Playing Fizzbin at the Indiana BMV

I have decided that it is easier to play Fizzbin (also known as Fizbin) than it is to conduct business at The Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

If you are a geek like me, you remember Fizzbin from the classic Star Trek original series episode “A Piece of the Action.” (See the end of this entry for a refresher if necessary.) For geeks, the name is synonymous with misdirection and confusing rules. And, unfortunately, that describes my last visit to the BMV.

As some of you may know, I am the primary caregiver for my 81 year old mother. 

My mother is 81 years old, legally blind and unable to walk without assistance.  I recently brought her here from Alabama to live with me in Indiana. (My mother had been an Indiana resident for over 30 years prior to moving to Alabama.)

On Friday, May 4, 2012, I took my mother to the my local License branch to get her a Indiana State Identification card. I had all the proper documents: Birth Certificate, Marriage License, Social Security Card, utility bills, bank statement, etc. (Now, it is worth noting here that I am college educated and previously worked for a government agency managing FTA and DOT grants, so I speak fluent bureaucrat.)

Even though I had all the necessary documentation as listed on the Indiana website, the license bureau rejected her social security card because it was “too old.” There is no qualification listed on the website that certain types of Social Security cards would be considered unacceptable. We were unable to get her ID card and now will have to make another trip.

I have several concerns: First, a reasonable person would have no way of knowing that any given Social Security card would be unacceptable. I, for example, am college educated and double checked the requirements before I came. I also had other acceptable documents with her Social Security number that I could have brought had I known that her card might not be good enough. I had no reason to question that a valid Social Security card would not be satisfactory.

Secondly, the staff was uncaring, particularly given my mother’s age and disability.

This ID law as practiced is onerous and a burden, especially to the elderly and disabled. To have to make more than one trip to get an ID card is deplorable, especially as the elderly and disabled often no longer drive and require assistance or have to pay someone to transport them.

Most troubling is the fact that in the 21st century, Indiana’s BMV website still does not give its citizens the information they need in order to conduct their business with the State.

On Monday I emailed three members of the Indiana HouLegislature expressing my concern:

…  First, a reasonable person would have no way of knowing that any given Social Security card would be unacceptable. I, for example, am college educated and double checked the requirements before I came. I also had other acceptable documents with her Social Security number that I could have brought had I known that her card might not be good enough. I had no reason to question that a valid Social Security card would not be satisfactory.

Secondly, the staff was uncaring, particularly given my mother’s age and disability.

This ID law as practiced is onerous and a burden, especially to the elderly and disabled. To have to make more than one trip to get an ID card is deplorable, especially as the elderly and disable often no longer drive and require assistance or have to pay someone to transport them.

Most troubling is the fact that in the 21st century, Indiana’s BMV website still does not give its citizens the information they need in order to conduct their business with the State.

So far, I’ve gotten several phone calls from legislators and a call from the branch manager anxiously offering to resolve my problem by running my mother’s number through the link with the Social Security office – even if I didn’t have the proper documentation.

Here’s what I want to know: Where was all this “help” on Friday when we made our initial visit? And what about fixing the BMV’s website so that someone really knows what to expect (and what to bring) when they come for an ID card or a driver’s license? This seems to be a point that is getting lost. Why is it that I am suddenly deserving of this help because I know how to contact a legislator’s office?

Silly me. I think that that the BMV should do everything it can to help every customer before sending them away empty-handed. Maybe Mr. Spock can compute the odds on that happening.

Here’s a “refresher course” in Fizzbin:

Is Indiana Social Media Going to the Dogs?

Is Indiana social media going to the dogs? Well, not yet it isn’t–at least if you pay attention to social media in Indiana.

Right now, social media peeps are voting in the 2nd Annual Indiana Social Media Summit.  And, interestingly enough, the Twitter account for the mascot for Butler University, @butlerblue2,  was nominated for the  Summit’s most influential social media dude in the 2010 contest.    Except there was a slight problem:  Turns out that since  @butlerblue2 is technically a dog and not a dude, he was disqualified and taken off the ballot.

That’s right. Disqualified. Even though @butlerblue2  made the point that “You do know that a ‘dude’ actually does my tweeting, right?” and even provided pictures of himself using Twitter.  I mean, we are talking here about a dog that has his own blog and his own email. And, he has more Twitter followers than I do! And if you read his Twitter feed, you will see that he is really quite the conversationalist.  If that  isn’t dog dude discrimination, then I don’t know what is.

And while it seems that @butlerblue2 is handling being disqualified from the the ballot with his usual good grace and equanimity, the whole situation certainly gave me paws pause. Some of the most attention- grabbing and influential ads that I recall have featured animal mascots such as Morris the Cat and the Taco Bell Chihuahua. 

And if the category is the most influential, shouldn’t it be the influence that actually matters? After all, we all know who the man behind the curtain really is.

Case in point:    Mashable.com recently did an article on the Top 10 Digital Advertising Innovations of 2010.  Number one on the list? The Old Spice Guy, Isaiah Mustafa, whose commercial ad and series of follow-ups went viral on the web. In the follow-ups, Mustafa posted video replies on YouTube to customers’ inquiries from Twitter. According to Mashable, Mustafa only responded to 180 inquiries. One of those video follow-ups was to a question from a dog that I happen to follow on Twitter, @theblacklab.

 That video, embedded below, has had over 100,000 views. And with that kind of a response, that makes me think that social media going to the dogs may not be a bad thing at all.